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Australia's election foes get personal

Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison and Opposition Leader, Anthony Albanese, attend the third leaders' debate of the 2022 federal election campaign in Sydney. - AFP
Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison and Opposition Leader, Anthony Albanese, attend the third leaders' debate of the 2022 federal election campaign in Sydney. - AFP

SYDNEY: Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison derided his Labor Party opponent on Wednesday as an unreliable "loose unit" on the economy as he fought to catch up in the opinion polls 10 days from May 21 federal elections.


In their third televised election debate, characterised as the "final showdown" before 17 million Australians cast their compulsory votes, Morrison and Labor's Anthony Albanese got personal.


"He's a loose unit when it comes to the economy. He makes things up as he goes along," said Morrison, using a slang term for someone who is unreliable because of the Labor leader's campaign stumbles.


At the outset of the campaign last month, Albanese forgot both the unemployment rate and the main lending rate. More recently, he apparently had difficulty explaining his party's disability policy.


Albanese hit back, accusing Morrison of shirking responsibility for the slow rollout of vaccines and rapid antigen tests in the Covid-19 pandemic, as well as for his management of the 2019-2020 "Black Summer" bushfires and this year's deadly east coast floods.


When Morrison faces challenges, he "blames someone else consistently", he said.


Albanese accused Morrison's conservative Liberal-National Party coalition of allowing climate change policy to drift.


The prime minister has vowed to mine and export coal for as long as there are buyers, touted a "gas-fired recovery" from the pandemic, and resisted global calls to cut carbon emissions faster by 2030.


"Climate change is real and it is here now. We see it with the bushfires and floods," Albanese told the Channel Seven-hosted debate.


"Australia can be a renewable energy superpower for the world if we seize this opportunity."


The pair also sparred on a string of other policy disagreements: Morrison's failure to fulfil a three-year-old campaign promise to create a federal anti-corruption commission; Albanese's support for minimum wages to match inflation; and Labor's backing for more government funding for childcare.


Despite the public wrangles, including in two previous election debates, the opinion polls have not budged much since Morrison called the election a month ago. A weekend Newspoll gave Labor a 54-46 per cent lead over Morrison's ruling coalition on a two-party basis. But few pundits are counting Morrison out. - AFP


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