Recollecting childhood memories of Ramadhan

The days of Ramadhan are more than just the fasting hours. It is more like a fairy-tale bliss.
As the calendar marks the last few days of Ramadhan this year, adults fondly reminisce their childhoods — recollecting those preliminary steps on the days of abstinence. The initial days of fasting are not only stepping stone to resolutions but are also perhaps the fondest remembrances to be shared with every passing generation.
For some it is the smell of the traditional Omani Halwa, for some the songs and clashing noise of shells as they smilingly sing the qaranqasho song, while most loved to be rewarded all 30 days of Ramadhan; and for all in the list, it is the best time to share their saga of contentment to the future generation .

A special opportunity provided by Allah, where one is rewarded for good deeds are multiplied further by recapitulating the good old days. It is happiness galore when the children try to fast even for a few hours a day. It not only adds perseverance and humbleness to their personality but it is also chance for the adults in the home to overwhelmingly share thoughts and memoirs of their childhood Ramadhan days.
Children become encouraged by the memories of the elders that are shared to them. Sharing stories during Ramadhan cheers them up and have proven to be a better and fun-filled way to inculcate the values and tradition in them.
Forty-eight-year-old Eram shared how diligently she followed the hours of fasting when she was 10 years old and waited till her father came home with load of surprises.
“I even celebrated my birthday during one of the Ramadhan months. My relatives brought me boxes of chocolate and cookies and I broke my fast eating them. I share my stories with my three children. They feel more contented while they fast. They even love to make colourful paper lanterns. And keep every corner of our home well decorated. They get bonus reward on that,” she said.
The giggles, clamours and the lovely qaranqasho song still reigns the memory lane of many like Fahad.
“I still wish I could join the celebration with the little ones. We used to beat drums, ring bells, and sing songs and wait eagerly for goody-bags, knocking every door in the village. I first celebrated qaranqasho at my grandparent’s place and learnt its importance from them. It was sheer joy,” he narrated.
Said al Oraimi, a resident of Sur, recollects how pleasant and gratifying his childhood was when he began his first fast.
“I was 8 years old, when I started my fasting, though unable to continue for till the 30th day, yet each day was filled with harmony. The smell of fitters, Omani Halwa, Kahwa still takes me back to those childhood days. Qaranqasho was the favourite celebration. I never missed it. My mother cooked food for all my friends and cousins. I remember playing with my sibling the whole day. The most amazing moment was when our aunt sat down by our side telling Ramadhan stories. We came to know about how she waited for her father to get her token gifts daily for her patience. Similarly, we too were rewarded for our patience each day by her,” he shared.
Inspired by the memoirs from his aunt’s, he chuckled when he recalled, “I used to compete with my brother and even my friends to never miss a single day of fasting and even who can complete reciting the Holy Quran verse first. Though our fasting lasted till my mother started cooking for Iftar, and some days it was only for three to four hours, yet, that initial practice has increased the level of perseverance in me today.”
A strict competition among siblings to top the fasting track record is something which grown-ups believe to be the stepping stone towards diligence.
Many like Said, Fahad and Eram love to share their childhood Ramadhan tales to his children. While competition helped them to thrive the hour of fasting, their innocent assorted ethnic tales brings families and friends closer, making the holy month achieve additional halo.
So what is it that you reminisce from your childhood?

axisswati@gmail.com