Oman Observer

BOOK REVIEW: Rainbow Dorm Diaries

A RIDE DOWN THE CHILDHOOD MEMORIES

The monsoon hit Ooty with a vengeance. The days were cold and wet, and the sun barely peeked out. Black cumulonimbus clouds gathered ominously in the skies and the heavens opened over Ooty.
…It rained with a vengeance, and the winds blew hard and fast. The girls hated getting out of bed in the mornings…
Readers are taken on an exciting ride down the memory lane and elaborately, yet humorously by Farseen Ashik in her maiden novel Rainbow Dorm Diaries — The Yellow Dorm.
“It has been my dream and my passion to write a novel since many years. The novel is my sincere attempt to reflect and relive our school life experiences and I hope that teens and even older audience will find it interesting and relate to the characters and experiences in the book,” said Farseen, during the launch of the book.
The novel is about teenagers from different backgrounds of life enrolled into a prestigious boarding school in the south Indian quaint hill station of Ooty.
In a lucid narrative, the novel describes new friendships the teens make, the peer-student relationships, their challenges and struggles to be independent in a dorm-life and other encounters in a new place from the point of view of teens. Loosely influenced by the Author’s own life the novel brings nostalgic memories of school life to everyone who reads it.
The first copy of the book was presented to Indra Mani Pandey Indian Ambassador to the Sultanate last week at the Tea Library, Sheraton Oman Hotel, by the author in the presence of invited media and dignitaries.
Farseen is the winner of the prestigious Montegrappa Writing Awards 2017 at the Emirates Airlines Festival of Literature.
Speaking to the Observer, she said, “I have always been an avid reader. I went through a lot of phases as a reader. Although I planned the book a few years before, it was last year that I could pen it down. Now it is dream come true for me”.
Published by Partridge, the novel describes new friendships the teens make, the peer-student relationships, their challenges and struggles to be independent in a dorm-life and other encounters in a new place from the point of view of teens.
Arthis is vibrant 12-year-old girl from Madras whose world is turned topsy-turvy by events at home. She finds herself in the Royal Academy for Young Women — a prestigious boarding school run by Christian nuns in the smoky Nilgris in South India. She is joined by Noorie, a girl from Kerala who is unhappy about this big change in her life.
The girls forge friendship and make their mark in the new school amid homesickness. The girls are soon drawn into a war of words that erupts in their classroom.